International MBA

Weighing the pros and cons of getting an MBA outside of the US

Weighing the pros and cons of getting an MBA outside of the US

Heads up, today's post is for the Americans among us, as we have been getting a lot of questions about international MBA programs.

If you are a US citizen trying to decide where you want to get your MBA degree, it can be tempting to think about schools outside the USA.  

After all, the world knows no boundaries thanks to technology and a global marketplace. Right? Spending a couple of years in Spain, England or Asia also sound like nice places to see new things and meet new people while you sharpen your business acumen.  And since most programs at reputable business schools are in English, you won’t face the language barrier that may have stopped you otherwise.  Seems like a slam dunk? Read on ... 

In Brief - What Counts as Significant International Work Experience?

In Brief - What Counts as Significant International Work Experience?

For international experience to be significant it has to be something that you can write about at length and appropriately in a b-school essay.

Tougher Standards for Foreign Born MBA Applicants?

A significant number of my clients are from India (non-US citizen). In my consulting conversations with them, the one thing I bring up with them is their status as an over-represented applicant group.   That is, there are a lot of applicants applying from India, probably more so than any other group.  Applicants to business school are not necessarily going to be compared against the whole pool but rather a subset.  Additionally, a majority of my clients  are from the IT consulting and operations arena within India, further reducing their opportunities to distinguish themselves from the pack.  While you many never hear an adcom talking about this phenomena, any grade, GMAT, work or extracurricular activity not up to snuff is a dealbreaker.  The Indian undergraduate institution is of particular importance to the adcoms as well.